Major causes of collapse of the mud houses in the flood affected areas.

Major causes of collapse of the mud houses in the flood affected areas. Flood effect on house in Bangladesh, Dinajpur District. Flood on 2017.



Mud houses ( walls constructed in mud)

These types of houses are made with molded earth. Earth lumps are made and stacked to make the wall. Earth is not compacted. When wall has been built, it is trimmed to give better finishing to the wall. Environmental performance of these buildings is very good but these are very vulnerable to floods or rain and earthquake.

Adobe (walls constructed with unfired mud bricks)

Adobe house made with mud blocks is similar to cement concrete block masonry, but blocks are made with mud, dried in sun and used with mud mortar. Wall thickness is generally 12inches. Adobe house made with mud bricks is similar to burnt brick masonry but bricks are not burnt and dried in sun and used with mud mortar. Generally wall thickness is kept 13.5 inches.

Mud bricks performance in shear, tension and compression

The mud bricks are very weak in shear, tension and compression. In case of earthquakes, walls separate at the corners and the shear cracks develop across the wall, causing collapse of the structure. Extensive damage was observed during earthquake especially if it occurs after a rainfall. Blonde and Garcia (2003) developed the design and construction manual for the adobe houses on the basis of 30 years experience at the Catholic University in Peru, which were followed in the reconstruction efforts after Pisco earthquake of 2007.

 Seismic performance of mud houses
Performance of traditional adobe construction during numerous Iranian earthquakes has generally been poor as reported by many researchers after assessing the post earthquake damages. Low material strength, poor workmanship, lack of proper connections between building elements, and the excessive weight of the building owning to thick walls and massive roofs, are some of the shortcomings that led to the general weakness of these buildings under earthquake loads (Maheri et al., 2005).

The performance of various non engineered houses was evaluated in earthquakes in successive earthquakes in Bangladesh. It was reported that mud houses are more vulnerable to earthquake than any other type of traditional house, because of its brittle nature and lack of lateral force resisting system. Some design interventions can improve the seismic performance of the mud houses, which may include wooden bracing at the corner location of the beams, metal straps at connections, placing of roof truss at proper location, blocking of excess opening, use of cement plaster over walls, insertion of new walls etc. (Jehangir et al., 2012). On the basis of field survey after floods in Bangladesh, it was suggested that the mud houses are more suitable for low flood areas particularly. The performance of single family two floor mud houses in Bangladesh located in semi urban and rural areas has been reported vulnerable to seismic forces and lateral pressure of the flood flows (EERI, IAEE, 2007).

Durability of mud blocks

The use of Cactus solution to improve the durability of adobe against the water erosion has also been recommended (Zavoni et al., 1988).The stabilization of adobe with lime depends on the nature of soils used for making the blocks. For rich clay soils, the addition of 2-3 % of quicklime to a soil quickly reduces plasticity by hydration (dries the soil) and breaks up the lumps. For both the clay loam and the sandy soils, the lime content of 2% resulted in a 7-day compressive strength of about 0.7 MPa, but increasing the percentage to 4% resulted in nearly doubling the compressive strength. However further increases in lime content led into no significant increase in compressive strength (Akpokodje, 1985).

In this paper, the major reasons for damages of the mud houses have been analyzed on the and extent of damages in these houses. The data was then tabulated and analyzed and the major causes leading to the collapse and damages of mud houses were documented. Based on the performance of these houses, some recommendations were made for the improvements of mud houses.




Observations:

On the basis of the damage assessment of the 100 sample houses partially and completely damaged, the major causes responsible for the destruction of these houses are as given below:

i.        Undermining of foundations
ii.      Scouring/erosion at the base of the walls

iii.    Scouring/erosion at the corners of structures
iv.      wiping out of structures
v.      Deposition of debris in houses
vi.    Damage due to debris flow.

vii.  Damage due to prolong submersion of buildings in water.

viii.It has been observed that many mud buildings were damaged even water did not touch the floors and due to the capillary rise walls lost strength.





Proposed design and construction improvements for the mud houses in the flood affected areas

Foundation and plinth


The depth of foundation is very important particularly when mud houses are subject to standing water for prolonged period. The following important points must be considered for foundations and plinths of the mud houses.

i.        The depth of foundation may be taken as min 4 feet for soft soil and 2 feet for hard soil. The width of foundation may be taken as twice the width of wall for soft soil and 1.5 times the wall width for hard soil.

ii.      The material to be used in foundation may be stones, fired bricks, solid blocks, dry stone masonry or plum concrete of nominal ratio of (1:3:6) with 40% of stones of total volume, where stones are available.

iii.    The plinth must be raised at least 6in above the high flood level. The Damp Proof Course of heavy polythene and water proof mud. For plinth protection 3 feet wide apron of burnt bricks having 3 in slope outwards may be provided.


 Raising of platform for construction of mud houses

Rising of platform and plinth above ground level will protect the mud houses from the access of water. The following improvements have been suggested (Design hand book, 2010):

i.        The platform must be raised at least 1ft above to regular flood level with compacted earth and extend the edges minimum 3ft away from building footprint.

ii.      The slope of platform may be maintained for sandy soil at 1V to 2H (For each vertical ft height, horizontal width of 2 feet) and for clayey soil; 1V:1.5H.

iii.    The water must be drained away from the building. For control of erosion of platform, deep rooted edge plants, bushes or grass may be grown on edge. Alternatively brick pitching may be provided.

 Walls

Thickness of wall is very important in mud houses. The following design and construction guidelines may be kept in the mind:

i.        For compressed adobe walls, the minimum thickness must be kept as 12in to 13.5 in and the height of the unsupported wall may be restricted to 8 feet and length to 14 feet.

ii.      For molded clay walls the wall thinness at the bottom may be kept as 18 in and the thickness of the wall at the top must be 12 in to increase the stability of the wall.


 Roof band and ring beams at lintel and plinth

i.        The bands may be made of wood, wire mesh, Reinforced Bricks (RB) or Reinforced Concrete (RCC), as feasible at site.

ii.      For wooden lintels, ladder type lintel may be made of 3in x 1.5 in with nails and cross pieces f 2in x 1.5 in @18 in c/c. Similarly wooden bands can be made of single piece of size 4in x 2 in with diagonals at the corners.

iii.    Roof bands must be tied with lintel and lintel bands by nailing diagonal woods at wall face, to provide stability against roof and wind. In case wood is not available, two courses must be provided with burnt masonry.

d.      Earth layer of 6’’ thick is laid over it, forming a slope of 12% towards spout and small amount of water is sprinkled to compact it to 4in and left for 2-3 days.

e.       Mud is prepared by using wheat husk and the roof surface is plastered 1’’ thick.

f.       1.5 ft extended spout is used or vertical drop of cemented spout with 1:3 to drain rain water is provided. For better rendering wire mesh should nails in wall and then plastered.

iii.    For pitched CGI sheets may be used for span up to 16 feet and the following recommendations may be followed:

a.       CGI Sheets 26 SWG gauge are placed at angle 25-35 degree having king post trusses

@5ft c/c and tie beam , rafters 3’’x4’’, king post 3’’x3’’, purlins of 2.5’’x2’’

b.      Longitudinal slope (1:300) should be provided in one side to harvest rain water and Projection up to 1.5 ft.

iv.    For light weight Thatch roof with mud plaster, the following improvements may be followed:

a.       Wooden/Bamboo having ridge beam, 3’’ dia ridge pole, 3’’ dia rafters @ 4 ft may be used. 1.5 in dia-purlin @ 1.5 ft spacing are provided.

Material selection for the mud structures

Selection of appropriate material for the mud construction is an important consideration. The following recommendations were made by the experts:

i.            For molded clay construction, soil with Sand 50-60%, Clay 20-25%, Gravel 20%, and Straw/chaff 5kg/CuM and Water 20% of total volume was recommended.

Soil for adobe and rammed earth may contain sand 40-45%, silt 15-30% and clay 10-25%.

Site selection for mud houses

Most of the mud houses collapsed during the floods 2010 was located in the flood plains. The site selection is of prime considerations in the construction of mud houses. For construction of mud houses, the raised and elevated platforms are more suitable to avoid threat to the buildings. The soil must be well compacted.



There are most experiences person is in with EWB Bangladesh for constructing of mud house  in. Bangladesh.

For More in formation please contact with Engineers Without Borders Bangladesh. 

Email: ewb.bangladesh@gmail.com

For that article some suggestions and thinking is practical oriented and some taken from different published papers.

Participation of EWB Bangladesh on Urban Thinker Campus in Bangladesh




Introduction:
Urbanization generally refers to a process in which an increasing proportion of an entire population lives in cities and surrounding of cities. Bangladesh is one of the fastest urbanizing countries in the world. Since
independence, its urban population has grown at about 6% annually.The
number of urban areas increased five-fold in less than twenty years and is
concentrated in the four largest cities: Dhaka, Chittagong, Khulna and Rajshahi.
But urbanization does not bring only fortune to our society, it bears some demerits as well. Some of the disadvantages of urbanization are:

1.     Increase of population.
2.     Movement of people from rural to urban areas.
3.     Increase of industries and factories.
4.     Farmers losing their farms.
5.     Cutting down forests.
6.     Global warming.
7.     Distraction in the eco-system.

So UTC (Urban Thinkers Campus) has recently organize a program Where EWB Bangladesh was the participant which is about “The Participatory & People-Centered New Urban Agenda: Voice from the Grassroots”. Despite some disadvantages, a better city for all and for continuing urbanization process a new urban agenda must be bring into front. The last program was about to discuss and come into result for those main points about urbanization.

Brief :
Their main Brief is about Urban migration is largely a result of seeking better educational and employment opportunities, especially in the readymade garments sector. Push factors are also important: While most people migrate for economic reasons, more than 26% do so due to environmental and climate related reasons such as natural disasters, river erosion and recurrent flooding. Many of the migrants are concentrated in urban slums as squatters where they live in poor conditions, with limited access to urban basic services.

Theme:
The theme of the UTC is “Voice from the Grassroots towards CITY for ALL” and the objectives are as follows:
1.     Sharing the New Urban Agenda for better understanding at the local level.
2.     Strengthen the engagement of the urban poor community, local
representatives, and the private sector in implementation of the New Urban
Agenda.
3.     Develop a declaration that lays out an agreed upon strategy for future
courses of action.
 
Roundtable sessions on the ground with poor community leaders and
ward councilors
Our participation program was completed in three levels:
(i) Roundtable sessions on the ground with poor community leaders and
ward councilors
(ii) To get extended coverage and publicity, a session on Meet
the Press
(iii) Two days program main event was held at AUST with parallel sessions;
urban lab, opening and closing session, and final declaration.
The main points of that program were to solve below problems by specific solvent for a better city:

1.     Household worker agency must.
2.     Labour pension must.
3.     Slum people identification as human settlement.
4.     Slum improvement.
5.     Create RMG worker housing by owner.
6.     Slum must be demolished by notice and make a housing for them.
7.     Make a way for poor people housing with micro credit.
8.     Slum capture by housing company.
9.     Slum sanitation must for a better health where toilet must be done with pit or without pit.

Conclusion                                                                                        
The principal outcome is a declaration that outlines future action, by private
sector, local authorities and grassroots women and men. The New Urban Agenda will almost certainly include significant focus on equity in the face of globalization as well as how to ensure the safety and security of everyone who lives in urban areas, of any gender and age.
New Urban Agenda adopted at Habitat III

The United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development has wrapped up in Quito, Ecuador, with delegations adopting the New Urban Agenda – a new framework that that lays out how cities should be planned and managed to best promote sustainable urbanization.

“We have analyzed and discussed the challenges that our cities are facing and have [agreed] on a common roadmap for the 20 years to come,” Joan Clos, Secretary-General of the conference and Executive Director of the UN Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat), told participants at the closing session.

Urban Inclusive at UTC

Event Title: “The Participatory and People-Centered New Urban Agenda”

WUC Partner Organization Hosting the Campus: Participatory Development Action Program (PDAP) / Coalition for the Urban Poor (CUP)

Venue: Dhaka/Bangladesh/Ahsanullah University of Science and Technology (AUST) 141 & 142, Love Rd

 
We are proud to be attain such kind of program and thanks to the all organizer and participants.

Urban Thinker Campus Report from World Urban Campaign Website


UTC REPORT: THE PARTICIPATORY & PEOPLE-CENTERED NEW URBAN AGENDA: VOICE FROM THE GRASSROOTS



Title of the Campus: The Participatory & People-Centered New Urban Agenda: Voice from the Grassroots
Organizer(s) Names: Huairou Commission
Partner Organization(s): Participatory Development Action Program (PDAP), Coalition for the Urban Poor (CUP), Ahsanullah University of Science and Technology (AUST)
Date and Location: 19 May 2017 - 21 May 2017 / Dhaka/Bangladesh / Ahsanullah University of Science and Technology (AUST) 141 & 142, Love Rd
Urban Thinkers Campus in figures: 





Executive summary
Bangladesh is one of the fastest urbanizing countries in the world. Since independence, its urban population has grown at about 6% annually. The number of urban areas increased five-fold in less than twenty years and is concentrated in the four largest cities: Dhaka, Chittagong, Khulna and Rajshahi. Dhaka is the epicenter of Bangladesh’s urban expansion and is said to be the fastest growing city in the world – it is currently estimated that 400,000 migrants, mainly poor and from rural areas, continue to arrive each year. Of an urban population of 44 million people in 2010, an estimated 9.4 million people (21.3 per cent) are living in absolute poverty, and 3.4 million (7.7 per cent) are in extreme poverty with consumption levels of around 1,805 Kcal per day or less. Urban migration is largely a result of seeking better educational and employment opportunities, especially in the readymade garments sector. Push factors are also important: While most people migrate for economic reasons, more than 26% do so due to environmental and climate related reasons such as natural disasters, river erosion and recurrent flooding. Many of the migrants are concentrated in urban slums as squatters where they live in poor conditions, with limited access to urban basic services.
Participatory Development Action Program (PDAP) and Coalition for Urban Poor (CUP) have been engaged in improving the socio-economic conditions of the urban poor in Bangladesh for many years. UN-Habitat also spearheaded an urban poverty alleviation project over 15 years. Based on the experiences of working with the poor communities and their local representatives, it was observed that the people on the ground who actively contribute to urban development never were discussed in planning, nor included in the implementation of any development programs; rather they were viewed as clients with no stake in program success and urban development.
CUP and PDAP organized the Urban Thinkers Campus in association with other partners and UN Habitat. The UTC was led by grassroots leaders and focused on women and other important stakeholder at the grassroots level who contribute  towards urban development. The theme of the UTC is “Voice from the Grassroots towards CITY for ALL” and the objectives are as follows:
1.       Sharing the New Urban Agenda for better understanding at the local level.
2.       Strengthen the engagement of the urban poor community, local representatives, and the private sector in implementation of the New Urban Agenda.
3.       Develop a declaration that lays out an agreed upon strategy for future courses of action. 


Introduction to the Campus
The UTC model is a unique initiative developed by UN-Habitat’s World Urban Campaign (WUC) to solicit input to The City We Need (TCWN)  involving 14 constituent groups such as Local and sub-national authorities, Research and Academia, Civil Society Organizations, Grassroots organizations, Women, Parliamentarians, Children and Youth, Business and Industries, Foundations and Philanthropies, Professionals, Trade Unions and Workers, Farmers, Indigenous people, and Media. The Urban Thinkers Campaign is conceived as an open space for critical exchange between urban actors who believe that urbanization is an opportunity and can lead to positive urban transformations. It is also intended as a platform to build consensus between partners engaged in addressing urbanization challenges and proposing solutions to urban future. The Campus is meant to be a place to share, learn and brainstorm on the new urban paradigm towards Habitat III. The format of the campus is flexible, based on open facilitated sessions, allowing for poor grassroots women leaders and local councilors participant interaction. Series of UTC were organized in different countries to provide inputs to New Urban Agenda.


Summary of all session
The UTC was completed in three levels:
(i) Roundtable sessions on the ground with poor community leaders and ward councillors in Gazipur on 6 May 2017, Rajshahi on 17 May 2017 and Mymensingh on 16 May 2017. The outputs of these roundtable sessions were presented at the larger plenary session in Dhaka. The first roundtable session in Gazipur was attended by more than 60 participants representing poor urban communities, ward councillors and city corporation’s staff. The roundtable discussed two issues; Access to urban basic services for all and Resource mobilization for the services. It was a successful program and participants engaged actively. The recommendations were noted by the participants and drafted for presentation in the final plenary session in Dhaka. The roundtable session in Mymensingh was attended by more than 50 participants representing poor urban communities, ward councillors and city corporation’s staff. The roundtable discussed two issues; Access to basic services for Urban poor and Urban planning and Disaster preparedness . It was also a successful program with active participation. The recommendations were noted by the participants and drafted for presentation in the final plenary session in Dhaka. The final roundtable was held at Rajshahi, jointly organized by Engineers Without Borders. They had conducted several FGD sessions with different target groups and finally agreed to key recommendations for the Plenary session in Dhaka.
(ii) To get extended coverage and publicity around the UTC, a session on Meet the Presswas held on 19 May 2017, a day before the main event at the National Press Club, Dhaka with representatives from electronic and Print Media. The session was chaired by renowned expert Prof. Nazrul Islam of CUS. About 50 participants from media and civil society organizations attended the event. The objectives of the proposed UTC and detailed programme were shared with the media, followed by answering questions from the media. 
(iii) The two days UTC main event was held at AUST with parallel sessions; urban lab, opening and closing session, and final declaration. 
Chairman of PKSF Dr. Qazi Kholiquzzaman Ahmad attended as Chief Guest in the opening session held on 20th May 2017. The opening session was also attended by special guests; Professor Dr. Kazi Shariful Alam, Treasurer AUST, Ms. Masuda Faruq Ratnan Convener of Programme Committee, CUP. Dr. Khurshid Zabin Taufiq, Director, Urban Development Directorate (UDD). Dr Taufique also presented the paper on the New Urban Agenda. In his presentation he briefly described the vision of his institution, the Urban Development Directorate, need for greater cooperation among all stakeholders for the “City We Need For All”, policy reform and importance of urbanization policies and equitable services for all.
To ensure good urban governance we need work with everyone in the city and also outside the city. The session on Ensuring Basic Service Delivery was chaired by Shah Md Anowar Kamal, Treasurer, CUP and Coordinator, WSSCC-B. The panel member was Mr. Asif Imran Khan, Advocacy Officer, Concern Worldwide. Mr. SMA Muyeed, Urban Coordinator RIC presented a paper on the topic. Running parallel to this session was one on Inclusive Urban Planning chaired by Professor Abul Kalam, Jahangir Nagar University and Chairman BIP. Dr Mainul Islam, Associate Professor Dhaka University and Mr Sujaul Islam Khan, Professor of Architecture AUST joined as panel members.
The main points of ensuring basic service delivery were:
1.       Recognize the urban poor as integral part of the urban society and build their capacity to ensure participation in urban planning and development.
2.       Introduce social protection schemes for all including the elderly people.
3.       Provision for establishing counseling center to assist the newly arrived poor people from rural areas regarding knowledge about the city life, location of service points, and how to get access to services.
4.       Promote culture and respect for diversity and equality as key elements in making our cities good human settlements.
The main points of inclusive urban planning were:
1.       Make provision for transportation system for the poor people at affordable cost with special emphasis on walkways, bicycling, disability and elderly people. 
2.       Create provision for education, social and cultural support to the children of the poor community ensuring they become future leaders of the city we need, leaders that don’t discriminate.
The second day (on 21 May 2017) started with plenary session to recap yesterday’s work and to brief about closing days activities. A roundtable session on Housing and Security of Tenure for the Poor was chaired by Mr. Mostafa Quaium Khan, Coordinator BUF. With Ms. Rabeya Sultana, Country Director, Help age International and Ms Sonia Islam, Architect and Urban Planner as panel members. Professor of Architecture AUST, Mr Sujaul Islam Khan presented his paper on this vital issue.
The next parallel session was on Disaster Risk and Management in the City, which was chaired by Dr Khwaja Shamsul Huda, Director Programme, DAM. He was joined by Dr. Saleemul Huq, Director ICCCAD and Mr Sarder Shafiqul Alam, Senior Research Coordinator ICCCAD as [panel member Mr Mohammed Jahangir Alam presented a paper on this issue on behalf of DAM.  
Ms. Zahida Fizza Kabir, Executive Director- SAJIDA Foundation chaired the two final sessions of the day where Mr Uttam Kumar Saha from Practical Action presented a paper on Technology, Innovation and Opportunities. Ms Kabir was joined by Ms Swapna Reza, MSS. Following this session was one on Governance and Resource Mobilization was discussed by Mr. AKM Tariqul Islam, CEO Mymensingh Municipality and Ms. Rasida Akter Jharna, Councilor (ward no. 6,7, and 8), Dhaka Uttar City Corporation.
The main points of Housing and Security of Tenure for the Poor were:
1.       Make provision of access to affordable housing, transport, utility services, education, health, legal, social, and security related services.
2.       Ensure access to land, housing and services with provision of soft term loan based on cross subsidy to the low-income group.
3.       Promote special housing or accommodation support and day care center to working women at affordable cost with shared responsibility of the owners and the government.
The main points of Disaster Risk and Management were:
1.       Promote Inclusive urban planning to address the needs of people from different economic class, occupation, gender, age, physical and disability.
2.       Promote risk sensitive planning by sharing experiences and knowledge of local community and create awareness and understanding to cope with a post disaster at local level.
3.       Ensure building green city with provision of affordable transport, public space, parks, etc. for all.
4.       Address the environmental pollution properly and maintain water bodies, forest, parks, etc. to ensure a green city.

The main points of Technology, Innovation and Opportunities were:
1.       Encourage innovations and alternative technologies for services based on the need of all societies.
2.       Ensure rights of the informal workers such as housekeepers, transport workers, security guards, vendors, etc. with employment conditions.
3.       Include economic development in planning with provision of skill development training and employment of eligible people irrespective of economic class, occupation, gender, age, physical and disability.
The main points of Inclusive Governance and Resource Mobilization were:
1.       Increase resource generation at equitable rate for future operation and maintenance of all the urban facilities.
2.       Encourage support from private sector in the form of charity, foundation or trust to the disadvantaged groups.
The Closing Session was chaired by Dr. Ehsanur Rahman, Executive Director for Dhaka Ahsania Mission. Present as Chief Guest was the Honorable  Member of Parliament, Democratic Republic of Bangladesh, Ms Qazi Rosy and she was joined by Mr. AKM Tariqul Islam, CEO Mymensingh Municipality, Mr Moinuddin Ahmed, Assistant Director, The Asian Age and Mr Md Akhtaruzzaman, Country Representative of UN Habitat. All guests appreciated this initiative and agreed to work together in future.



Key outcomes of the UTC
The principal outcome is a declaration that outlines future action, by private sector, local authorities and grassroots women and men. The goal of these actions is to engender inclusive urban planning and development that addresses the needs of the people on the ground.


Conclusion & way forward
More than 225 grassroots women, men, local councilor, stakeholders, experts, Architects and urban planner attended at the Urban Thinkers Campus 2017. Their active participations and patience have made our event successful. 
DHAKA DECLARATION: Voice from the Grassroots
Participatory Development Action Program (PDAP) and Coalition for Urban Poor (CUP) have been engaged in improving the socio-economic conditions of the urban poor for many years in Bangladesh. UN-Habitat also spearheaded an urban poverty alleviation project for 15 years. Based on the experiences in working with the poor communities and their local representatives, it was observed that the people on the ground who really contribute to urban development never were discussed in planning, nor included in the implementation of any development program. Rather they were viewed as beneficiaries  with no stake in programme success and urban development. Therefore, the Urban Thinkers Campus organized by PDAP (with support from Huairou Commission) was focused on poor women and others at the grassroots level, who contribute most toward urban development. The theme of the UTC was “Voice from the Grassroots People towards CITY for ALL.”
UTC  Programme:
The Urban Thinkers Campus “The Participatory & People-Centered New Urban Agenda: Voice from the grassroots” has been organized around an inaugural session, Urban Thinkers sessions and Urban Labs, and several roundtable dialogues at Ahsanullah University of Science and Technology, Dhaka (main event) and with the poor communities and local government representatives at Gazipur, Mymensingh and Rajshahi towns. The emerging recommendations from these roundtable sessions/dialogues were brought to discussion in the final plenary; the concluding session produced a set of recommendations as Dhaka Declaration in 6 thematic areas with call for joint actions by the stakeholders.
A.      Inclusive city
B.      Recognize the urban poor as integral part of the urban society and build their capacity to ensure participation in urban planning and development.
C.      Ensure rights of the informal workers such as housekeepers, transport workers, security guards, vendors, etc. with employment conditions.
D.      Introduce social protection schemes for all including the elderly people.
E.       Provision for establishing counselling center to assist the newly arrived poor people from rural area regarding knowledge about the city life, location of service points and how to get access to services.
F.       Promote culture and respect for diversity, and equality as key elements in making our cities good human settlements.

A.      Urban Services
B.      Make provision for transportation system for the poor people at affordable cost with special emphasis on walkways, bicycling, disability and elderly people.
C.      Create provision for education, social and cultural support to the children of the poor community for becoming future leader of the city we need without any discrimination.
D.      Encourage innovations and alternative technologies for services based on the need of all societies.

A.      Housing and shelter
B.      Make provision of access to affordable housing, transport, utility services, education, health, legal, social, and security related issues.
C.      Ensure access to land, housing and services with provision of soft term loan based on cross subsidy to low-income groups.
D.      Promote special housing or accommodation support and day care center to working women at affordable cost with shared responsibility of the owners and the government.

A.      Urban planning
B.      Promote Inclusive urban planning to address the needs of a diversity of people; different economic classes, occupation, gender, age, and disabilities.
C.      Include economic development in planning with provision of skill development training and employment of eligible people irrespective of economic class, occupation, gender, age, physical and disability.
D.      Promote risk sensitive planning by sharing experiences and knowledge of local community and create awareness and understanding to cope with a post disaster at local level.
E.       Make provision for engaging the city leaders (elected Mayor, Counsellors) on board for inclusive planning and all development activities. 
F.       Engage all kind of media to promote the ideas of livable City in line with SDGs and New Urban Agenda.

A.      Financing
B.      Increase resource generation at equitable rate for future operation and maintenance of all the urban facilities.
C.      Encourage support from private sector in the form of charity, foundation or trust to the disadvantaged groups.

A.      Green city
B.      Ensure building green city with provision of affordable transport, public space, parks, etc. for all.
C.      Address the environmental pollution properly and maintain water bodies, forest, parks, etc. for green city.
WE ARE CITY CHANGERS TO MAKE THE CITY LIVABLE FOR ALL


MONITORING & REPORTING 
1. How do you intend to monitor the achievements and progress in the implementation of your action plan approved at your Campus (success indicators and other measures of achievement should be proposed)?
We intend to organize local dialogues, workshops and meetings where local government representatives, planners, and local community leaders will be joining and openly discuss the action plan and the implementation.

Action A) Using a participatory platform for urban stakeholders to influence urban planning
Indicators:
1.      Grassroots women’s leadership positions as public advocates
2.      Community based network’s influence on urban policy and practice.
3.      Diversity of stakeholders involved in urban planning and resilience efforts.
4.      Number of participants at local meetings.

Method of Data Collection:
·         Meeting Minutes
·         Attendance Lists
·         Media Articles
·         Policy Reports

Action B) Develop community based network to strengthen community resilience
Indicators:
1.       Development of grassroots women practices and leadership skills.
2.       Community resilience action plan mapping risks, opportunities, and partnerships
3.       No of exchanges of local risk reduction and resilience building practices.
4.       Participatory dialogues between grassroots women and other urban stakeholders to establish multi-community action plans.

Method of Data Collection:
·         Local dialogue
·         Data collection
·         Interview with community based initiatives
·         Meeting Minutes
·         Attendance Lists

Action C) Environmental movement: promotion and awareness raising about the importance of Public Space
Indicators:
1.       Increased public awareness about the importance and use of public spaces.
2.       Residents can list at least two health and well- being related reasons why public spaces are important.
3.       Number of participants at meetings and number of people who join the movement.
4.       Frequency of gatherings of movement participants in public spaces.
5.       Presence of funding designated to support this action.
Method for data collection:
·         Attendance Lists
·         Perception Survey
·         Interview

1.     Explain how you intend to share the results of your action plan with the WUC community and other partners in order to jointly implement the New Urban Agenda?

●     Through Huairou Commission, we will share the results of our action plan with the WUC community and other partners in order to jointly implement the New Urban Agenda.


List of key speakers
1.       Chairman of PKSF and Dhaka School of Economics Dr. Qazi Kholiquzzaman Ahmad attended
2.       Professor Dr. Kazi Shariful Alam, Treasurer AUST as Special Guest.
3.       Dr. Khurshid Zabin Taufiq, Director, Urban Development Directorate (UDD)
4.       Shah Md Anowar Kamal, Treasurer, CUP and Coordinator, WSSCC-B
5.       Mr Asif Imran Khan, Advocacy Officer, Concern Worldwide
6.       Mr SMA Muyeed, Urban Coordinator RIC presented a paper on the topic.
7.       Professor Abul Kalam, Jahangir Nagar University and Chairman BIP
8.       Dr Mainul Islam, Associate Professor, Dhaka University
9.       Mr Sujaul Islam Khan, Professor of Architecture, AUST
10.    Dr Khwaja Shamsul Huda, Director Programme, DAM.
11.    Dr. Saleemul Huq, Director ICCCAD
12.    Mr Sarder Shafiqul Alam, Senior Research Coordinator ICCCAD.
13.    Mr Mohammed Jahangir Alam, Assistant Director, DAM.  
14.    Ms Zahida Fizza Kabir, Executive Director- SAJIDA Foundation
15.    Mr Uttam Kumar Saha from Practical Action
16.    Ms Swapna Reza, MSS.
17.    Mr. AKM Tariqul Islam, CEO Mymensingh Municipality
18.    Ms. Rasida Akter Jharna, Councilor (ward no. 6,7, and 8), Dhaka North city Corporation.
19.    Dr. Ehsanur Rahman, Executive Director for Dhaka Ahsania Mission.
20.    Ms Qazi Rosy, Honourable  Member of Parliament, Democratic Republic of Bangladesh,
21.    Mr Md Akhtaruzzaman, Country Representative of UN Habitat


List of Participants by Partner Group 
1.       Business and industries
2.       Civil Society Organizations
3.       Grassroots Organizations
4.       Local and Sub-national Authorities
5.       Media
6.       Older Persons
7.       Parliamentarians
8.       Professionals
9.       Reseach and Academia
10.    Women


List of All Participants
1.       Mr. Samsuddoha
2.       Ataur Rahman
3.       Sumsul Alam Khan
4.       Nur Hossain
5.       Md. Javed
6.       Masuda Farouk Ratna
7.       Quazi Baby
8.       Kazi  Shaiful Alam
9.       Qazi  Khaliquzzaman Ahmad
10.    Md. Akhtaruzzaman
11.    Dr. Taufique
12.    Salma Akther
13.    Monir Hossain
14.    Shamit Helal
15.    Shakil  Ferdous
16.    Mahbuba Begum
17.    Sumon
18.    Md. Ayomod Hssain
19.    Rasheda Akter zarna
20.    Lata begum
21.    Saifur Ialam
22.    Rebaka Sunyat
23.    Adv. Md. Shamsuddin
24.    Shakila Farzana Paru
25.    Rina Khanam
26.    Abeda
27.    Madina
28.    Jahanara
29.    Janatul Ferdous
30.    Ishaq Mia
31.    Zarina Begum
32.    Md. Alauddin
33.    Md. Motaleb Hossain
34.    Md. Altaf Hossain
35.    Md. Iqbal Hossain
36.    Dr. Shehzad
37.    Md. Alam Gazi
38.    Md. Miraz Mia
39.    Zahidul Islam
40.    Johan Sarkar
41.    Masuda Faruq Ratna
42.    Sultana
43.    Monoara
44.    Hazera
45.    Nisha
46.    Rina
47.    Rubina
48.    Taslima
49.    Asma
50.    Masuma
51.    Purnima
52.    Morsheda
53.    Sumi Aktar           
54.    Kohinur
55.    Rubi Aktar
56.    Brishti Aktar
57.    Afroza
58.    Alo
59.    Reba dus
60.    Champa
61.    Subarna
62.    Shumi
63.    Shah Md. Anwar Kamal
64.    Md. Saidur Rahman
65.    Md. Shahrior Kabir
66.    Md. Zahidul Islam
67.    Zillur Rahman
68.    Asif Khan
69.    Sarder Shafiqul Alam
70.    Dibbendu Saha
71.    Md. Matin
72.    Ftema
73.    Mojibor Rahman
74.    Moushumi
75.    Naimul Aziz
76.    Md. Monirul Islam
77.    Noor Hossain
78.    Hafizur Rahman
79.    Ahsan Habib        
80.    Israful Hossain
81.    SMA Muyeed
82.    Md. Shamsuddin
83.    Md. Hasem Ali
84.    Md. Taslim
85.    Sewli Aktar
86.    Jahanara Begum
87.    Abul Kasem
88.    Subarn Jahan Bithi
89.    Mahmuda Siddika Ruby
90.    Md. Arif Hossain Chowdhury
91.    Olivia Parvin
92.    Sahin
93.    Tariq Ali
94.    Mahbubur Rahman
95.    Mehdi Khan
96.    Dr, AKM Abul Kalam          
97.    Md. Moshiur Rahman
98.    A.A. Maruf Hossain
99.    Manik Biswas
100.Md. Kawsar Hossain
101.Shilpi
102.Khadija
103.Musammad Nurun nahar
104.Anwara Begum
105.Asia Begum
106.Hanufa Begum
107.Md. Hafez Ahmed
108.S.K. Saud
109.Md. Taiyob ali
110.Hasina Arif
111.Md. Omor Faruq   
112.Samima
113.Zubair Hossain
114.Nur Islam
115.Abdul Barek
116.Md. Riazul Islam
117.Sufi Ahmed Parvez
118.Md. Zahid Hossain
119.Rumana Afroz
120.Shahidul Islam
121.Anowar
122.Rebaka
123.Harun
124.Md. Rana
125.Salim
126.Bappi
127.Lala Mia
128.Shahin
129.Hazrat
130.Tahmina Aktar
131.Ankhi Aktar
132.Fatema        
133.Anzuara
134.Shaheduzzaman Shemol
135.Nazma Aktar
136.Salma          
137.Rubina
138.Saleha
139.Farzana Aktar
140.Beauty Begum
141.Hosne ara Rafeza
142.Mosammat Sahida Begum
143.Mosammat Khurshida
144.Qazi Shakera        
145.Salina
146.Zaida  
147.Nargis aktar
148.Firoza
149.Parvin
150.Jolly Ahmed
151.Momtaz          
152.Hamid Faqir
153.Farzana aktar
154.Tahmina Aktar            
155.Saleha Begum
156.Saleemul Haq
157.Rabeya Sultana
158.Sarifur Rahman
159.Sonia Islam
160.Salina      
161.Zayeda
162.Swapna Reza
163.Salma                   
164.Nurunnahar
165.Khadija
166.Rubina                  
167.Asia
168.Salim
169.Harun      
170.Md Sah Alam
171.Md. Jahangir Alam
172.Sahidul Islam
173.Rana
174.Hafez Ahmed
175.Afroza
176.Honufa
177.Md. Yusuf Ali
178.Md. Hafiz
179.Morsheda
180.Jaidai Aman         
181.Meher Nisar
182.Imran Amin
183.Dr. Belayet Hossain
184.AR Masudur Rasid
185.ARSM Arafat Hossain
186.Md. Nasiuddin      
187.Tanvir Ferdous
188.Razia Sultana
189.Nujaba Binte Kabir
190.Shafiq Rahman     
191.Dr. Ehsanur Rahman
192.Dr. K.S. Huda
193.Uttam Kumar Saha
194.Zahida F. Kabir
195.Md. Shah Alam        
196.Alontika Sara Israt
197.Mehnaz Tabassum
198.Monira Khonker
199.Mosteque Ifat
200.Rumana Afroz
201.AKM  Tariqul Alam
202.Dr. Neelopal Adri
203.Aysha siddiq
204.Nurul Islam
205.Koli
206.Md. Masfiqur Rahman
207.Rana Dus
208.ABM Mahbubul
209.Zishan F. Chowdhury
210.Shubas Chandro Das
211.Dilruba
212.Farzana
213.Mahbuba
214.Mahmuda Khatun
215.Md. Mofiz Kazi         
216.Mahmuda Siddiqa Ruby
217.Asma Siddiqa
218.Nusrat Wahid
219.Jinia Sharmin
220.Naimul Asif
221.Lata
222.Mahfuja Sharmin
223.AKM Saidur Rahman
224.Ms.Qazi Rosy MP


List of organizations represented:
1.       PKSF
2.       UN Habitat
3.       UDD
4.       CPRD
5.       BWHC
6.       DAM
7.       BAWSE
8.       Nobo Jatra Foundation
9.       Councilor
10.    Social worker
11.    Dhaka North City Corporation 
12.    CBO member
13.    UST
14.    Concern World Wide
15.    UDD
16.    ICCCAD /IUB
17.    Dhaka University
18.    RIC
19.    GBSS             
20.    DSK
21.    Youth Leader
22.    BIP
23.    EWB
24.    BLAST         
25.    CUP
26.    Air Force
27.    Student Dhaka University
28.    NASAF
29.    CDC
30.    CBO Federation
31.    CBO Leader
32.    PDAP
33.    NBUS
34.    NDBUS     
35.    ICCCAD
36.    Help Age
37.    UST
38.    Architect
39.    CBO Federation
40.    MSS
41.    CBO Cluster            
42.    IUBAT
43.    Practical Action             
44.    Sajida Foundation
45.    BOSC
46.    Mymensingh City Corporation
47.    BIDS          
48.    CBO
49.    AIUB         
50.    Nari Moitre
51.    BAWSE
52.    CSID
53.    DAM          
54.    NASAF
55.    AUST
56.    World Vision
57.    Parliament Member of Bangladesh


List of countries represented
1.       Bangladesh


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